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Scott P. Richert

The Christian Vision of Steve Jobs

By October 6, 2011

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I learned of the passing of Steve Jobs the way so many others did: on my iPhone. My wife and I were having dinner at one of our favorite restaurants on the evening of October 5, 2011, the day that the November issue of Chronicles: A Magazine of American Culture (the monthly magazine of which I am executive editor) went to press. The fact that we were enjoying good food under a starlit sky on this beautiful Indian summer evening was, in its own way, a tribute to the genius of the man who had revolutionized the print publishing industry over the past quarter of a century—something for which Jobs was rarely given credit, but which I had discussed in my column "Success(ion)" in the October issue of Chronicles, written the day after Jobs announced his retirement as Apple's CEO.

My iPhone made an unusual sound, and almost instinctively I pulled it from my shirt pocket. The Drudge Report app had sent a push notification: "Steve Jobs Is Dead." I unlocked the iPhone, and an iconic picture of Jobs (was there ever any other kind?) filled the screen. I handed my iPhone to my wife, though I barely registered her response. The rest of the dinner was a blur, in more ways than one.

Back in August, when Steve Jobs announced his retirement, I wrote a post for the About.com Catholicism GuideSite entitled "A Catholic Looks at Steve Jobs."Apple CEO Steve Jobs unveils the iPad 2 at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts on March 2, 2011, in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) Despite the fact that I had intended the piece as a clear expression of the admiration I've felt for decades for this man whose passion and dedication had changed my life, and that of my family, coworkers, and friends, for the better, some readers were upset with what I wrote. They thought it unnecessary to mention that others have asked me how I could admire a man who held certain political and moral views that were at odds with Catholic teaching.

Yet for me, this was consistent with the reasons I so admired Steve Jobs. Jobs was not a politician; he didn't adopt his views because they were convenient, or adapt them because of public pressure. He knew what he believed, and why he believed it, and that was enough. That I think he was truly and sincerely wrong in some of those beliefs does not change the fact that every Catholic could learn something from Steve Jobs about what it means to stand up for what you believe in.

And we can learn, too, something about how we should live our lives. Many tributes to Steve Jobs written in the hours since his death have mentioned his 2005 commencement address at Stanford. Of all of his public appearances, that address may have been the one that most fully offered a glimpse into the inner life of Steve Jobs:

When I was 17, I read a quote that went something like: "If you live each day as if it was your last, someday you'll most certainly be right." It made an impression on me, and since then, for the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: "If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?" And whenever the answer has been no for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.

At the very moment in history when all too many Catholics have abandoned the traditional Christian wisdom that the remembrance of death is the best way to prepare ourselves for it—and thus the best way to live our lives to the fullest—a professed Buddhist reminded us of something we should have known all along. As Christians, we have no reason to fear death, so long as we live our lives united to the Cross of Christ. Rather than shunning death, pushing it to the margins of our consciousness, avoiding its ubiquitous presence in our lives, we should embrace it—not, of course, in a life-destroying way, but in a life-affirming one. "O death, where is thy victory? O death, where is thy sting?" (1 Corinthians 15:55).

Or, as Steven Paul Jobs—who was baptized a Christian and confirmed in the very Pauline Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod long before he discovered Buddhism—told the graduating class at Stanford:

Remembering that I'll be dead soon is the most important tool I've ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure - these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. . . .
No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life.

Too many Christians today think of death only as a punishment. Yes, death entered the world through Adam's sin; man was not meant to die. But the Fathers of the Church, especially the Eastern Fathers, saw death not only as punishment but as a gift. They understood Romans 6:23 in a way that all too many Christians today cannot comprehend: "For the wages of sin is death. But the grace of God, life everlasting, in Christ Jesus our Lord." Death is the gateway to eternal life. It is the door through which we who know, love, and serve God in this world must walk in order to be happy with Him in the next.

Had God allowed man to live forever after Adam had eaten of the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil, life on earth, the Fathers said, would have become a living hell. Death frees us from that possibility, and Christ frees us from death. The remembrance of death reminds us that the only thing we have to lose is our immortal soul. Take up your cross, and follow Christ, and everything else will take care of itself.

Steve Jobs' Stanford commencement address does not read like a Buddhist manifesto. There is something about it that, if not intentionally Christian, is at least consonant with the best of Christian teaching. I like to think that, when Jobs was composing it, the lessons of his Lutheran catechism kept bubbling up in his mind.

And any Christian whose life has been touched by the technology that Steve Jobs brought into the world will in charity also hope and pray that those same lessons came to mind yesterday, as he approached the final moments of his earthly life, surrounded by his beloved family and the guardian angel who never abandoned him even when he sought a different path.

May God grant Steven Paul Jobs blessed repose and eternal memory.

More on Steve Jobs and Apple:

Apple CEO Steve Jobs unveils the iPad 2 at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts on March 2, 2011, in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

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Comments
October 6, 2011 at 8:27 pm
(1) Paul Brown says:

Steve Jobs used his God given creative and technical abilities to give us some wonderful inventions. Likewise, our world is filled with great accomplishments from individuals from every walk of faith. As great as his contributions and desire to make his days count, his salvation has nothing to do with them. God is clear that we overcome death simply through believing in Him. He also said He is the only way to the Father and it is appointed to man to die once and after that to face judgment. We can pray that Steve’s family and everyone that is enjoying the accomplishments of his life turn to Christ for the forgiveness of their sins but Steve’s time to put his trust in Christ for his salvation has passed. His life is a sobering reminder that our accomplishments, fame or fortune are meaningless when God says that the wages of sin is death.

October 6, 2011 at 10:57 pm
(2) Scott P. Richert says:

Mr. Brown, did you read the entire post, or did you come here simply to express your own point? In the post, I discussed Romans 6:23 (“The wages of sin is death”), and the way in which the Fathers of the Church understood that passage. The fact that Steve Jobs own understanding of death is consonant with that of the Fathers of the Church gives those who admired him reason to hope that, in the end, his baptism, confirmation, and Christian education won out.

To assume otherwise, as Mr. Brown seems to (“Steve’s time to put his trust in Christ for his salvation has passed’) is not in keeping with Christian charity.

October 8, 2011 at 10:48 am
(3) Blessed says:

GOD’S WORD® Translation (©1995)
People die once, and after that they are judged. Hebrews9: 27

GOD’S WORD® Translation (©1995)
He will convict the world of sin, because people don’t believe in me.

As therefore the tares are gathered and burned in the fire; so shall it be in the end of this world. 41The Son of man shall send forth his angels, and they shall gather out of his kingdom all things that offend, and them which do iniquity; 42And shall cast them into a furnace of fire: there shall be wailing and gnashing of teeth. 43Then shall the righteous shine forth as the sun in the kingdom of their Father. Who has ears to hear, let him hear. Matthew13: 40-43

Hebrew10: 38-39
Revelation20: 11-15

October 16, 2011 at 7:44 am
(4) deny says:

Hello Scott,
I was born and raised Lutheran Church Missouri Synod, exactly as Steve Jobs, I am 57, also have cancer(don’t know if I survive long-term either)…
I am now a Roman Catholic…
a). God is fair and just…
b). We can hope that Steve returned to Christ his remaining hours,as Christ said to the thief on a cross,”Today you will be with me in eternal paradise.”
c). I leave all judgement to God…
With love, ‘deny’

October 7, 2011 at 10:28 am
(5) Jesse Wright says:

Continue to to touch the lives of corporate America by sharing the good news of the gospel. Far to many put there trust in uncertain riches and in the wisdom of men. For God has chosen the foolish things of the world to confound the wise . May they know that true wisdom is in knowing Jesus and accepting Gods plan of salvation. Great comment my brother.

November 14, 2011 at 5:14 am
(6) robin john says:

How very true!
let me complete that last verse …but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.

October 6, 2011 at 8:47 pm
(7) Judahs Darling says:

No one comes to the Father but through His son, Jesus. Mr Jobs may have been talented and wealthy beyond the dreams of most of us, but was he washed in the blood of Christ? For we know that Buddah did not die on the cross for our sins. What a pity.

October 6, 2011 at 11:04 pm
(8) Scott P. Richert says:

Like Mr. Brown, “Judah’s Darling” seems to have rushed to the comments box without reading the entire post. “[W]as he washed in the blood of Christ?” Yes, at his baptism. And he was confirmed in the Spirit. And even if he thought that he left Christ behind when he adopted Buddhism, Christ never left him behind.

Nigh and nigh draws the chase,
With unperturbèd pace,
Deliberate speed, majestic instancy;
And past those noisèd Feet
A voice comes yet more fleet—
‘Lo! naught contents thee, who content’st not Me!’

As Christians, we can and should hope that the Hound of Heaven did, in the end, catch up with the man whom He loved so much, as He loves all of us.

October 7, 2011 at 2:06 pm
(9) Janeen says:

I believe at our judgement after we die, Our Lord Jesus Christ asks us if we want to spend the rest of eternity with Him in heaven. That is what purgatory is for in the scheme of things. Let us remember His kingdom on earth is in our hearts, but His eternal kingdom is there for anyone who seeks Him. I believe his baptism will save him. Our Lord is a God of mercy before judgement.

October 7, 2011 at 2:06 pm
(10) Mauro says:

Scott, I think the last comment by the Anglican friar here says it all, if Jobs got or not to Heaven is not for us to be discussed. (st.Paul says this in the letters btw, can’t search for the exact citation right now)

We can and should pray for his soul if we feel so in our heart.
He did deeply influence my own life and thinking, and I have been an apple fanboy for years… So I can totally see where you are coming from.

However, you should also take in consideration that you have raised the topic in the post, and what is written did seem to imply that you will get saved because you are baptized, even if you did not accept Jesus as your savior in your life afterwards.

That’s a delicate topic, and a pretty fundamental one for any Christian IMHO. It comes to no surprise that people needed to affirm clearly their beliefs.

In my understanding the commenters are right in saying the doctrine says you can’t be saved if you did not accept “Him who saves” in your life, independently of the sacraments received.

Then again, it’s not for us to discuss on a case by case basis and it’s so sad we end up doing it when it comes to Steve Jobs.

I just leave this to God and will pray for his soul.

October 7, 2011 at 3:09 pm
(11) Louise Cowley says:

Thank you Scott, for what you have written about Christian charity. I used to follow Buddhism before I turned to Christ and many of the values embraced are the same as Christianity- it is certainly about love for your neighbour. As you say, he was baptised and confirmed, and was a good man. I’m sure he is in a good place now.
Thank you for a fitting tribute to him.

October 8, 2011 at 12:19 pm
(12) Blessed says:

18Dear children, this is the last hour; and as you have heard that the antichrist is coming, even now many antichrists have come. This is how we know it is the last hour. 19They went out from us, but they did not really belong to us. For if they had belonged to us, they would have remained with us; but their going showed that none of them belonged to us. 1John 2: 18

22Who is the liar? It is the man who denies that Jesus is the Christ. Such a man is the antichrist—he denies the Father and the Son. 1John 2: 22

12He who has the Son has life; he who does not have the Son of God does not have life. 1 John 5: 12

October 7, 2011 at 1:44 am
(13) KDYER says:

Who cares what I say: Read Truth:
1 Corinthians 15
42 So will it be with the resurrection of the dead. The body that is sown is perishable, it is raised imperishable; 43 it is sown in dishonor, it is raised in glory; it is sown in weakness, it is raised in power; 44 it is sown a natural body, it is raised a spiritual body.

If there is a natural body, there is also a spiritual body. 45 So it is written: “The first man Adam became a living being”[f]; the last Adam, a life-giving spirit. 46 The spiritual did not come first, but the natural, and after that the spiritual. 47 The first man was of the dust of the earth; the second man is of heaven. 48 As was the earthly man, so are those who are of the earth; and as is the heavenly man, so also are those who are of heaven. 49 And just as we have borne the image of the earthly man, so shall we[g] bear the image of the heavenly man.

50 I declare to you, brothers and sisters, that flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God, nor does the perishable inherit the imperishable. 51 Listen, I tell you a mystery: We will not all sleep, but we will all be changed— 52 in a flash, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet. For the trumpet will sound, the dead will be raised imperishable, and we will be changed. 53 For the perishable must clothe itself with the imperishable, and the mortal with immortality. 54 When the perishable has been clothed with the imperishable, and the mortal with immortality, then the saying that is written will come true: “Death has been swallowed up in victory.”[h]

55 “Where, O death, is your victory?
Where, O death, is your sting?”[i]

October 7, 2011 at 1:48 am
(14) KDYER says:

42 So will it be with the resurrection of the dead. The body that is sown is perishable, it is raised imperishable; 43 it is sown in dishonor, it is raised in glory; it is sown in weakness, it is raised in power; 44 it is sown a natural body, it is raised a spiritual body.

If there is a natural body, there is also a spiritual body. 45 So it is written: “The first man Adam became a living being”[f]; the last Adam, a life-giving spirit. 46 The spiritual did not come first, but the natural, and after that the spiritual. 47 The first man was of the dust of the earth; the second man is of heaven. 48 As was the earthly man, so are those who are of the earth; and as is the heavenly man, so also are those who are of heaven. 49 And just as we have borne the image of the earthly man, so shall we[g] bear the image of the heavenly man.

50 I declare to you, brothers and sisters, that flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God, nor does the perishable inherit the imperishable. 51 Listen, I tell you a mystery: We will not all sleep, but we will all be changed— 52 in a flash, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet. For the trumpet will sound, the dead will be raised imperishable, and we will be changed. 53 For the perishable must clothe itself with the imperishable, and the mortal with immortality. 54 When the perishable has been clothed with the imperishable, and the mortal with immortality, then the saying that is written will come true: “Death has been swallowed up in victory.”[h]

October 7, 2011 at 2:00 am
(15) KDYER says:

Mark 3: 31 Then Jesus’ mother and brothers arrived. Standing outside, they sent someone in to call him. 32 A crowd was sitting around him, and they told him, “Your mother and brothers are outside looking for you.”

33 “Who are my mother and my brothers?” he asked.

34 Then he looked at those seated in a circle around him and said, “Here are my mother and my brothers! 35 Whoever does God’s will is my brother and sister and mother.”
John 3:5 Jesus answered, “Very truly I tell you, no one can enter the kingdom of God unless they are born of water and the Spirit. 6 Flesh gives birth to flesh, but the Spirit[b] gives birth to spirit. 7 You should not be surprised at my saying, ‘You[c] must be born again.’ 8 The wind blows wherever it pleases. You hear its sound, but you cannot tell where it comes from or where it is going. So it is with everyone born of the Spirit.”[d]
John 4:21 “Woman,” Jesus replied, “believe me, a time is coming when you will worship the Father neither on this mountain nor in Jerusalem. 22 You Samaritans worship what you do not know; we worship what we do know, for salvation is from the Jews. 23 Yet a time is coming and has now come when the true worshipers will worship the Father in the Spirit and in truth, for they are the kind of worshipers the Father seeks. 24 God is spirit, and his worshipers must worship in the Spirit and in truth.”

October 7, 2011 at 2:02 am
(16) KDYER says:

AM I Catholic or Am I a Follower of Jesus? If some one asks me my faith…what should I say?

October 7, 2011 at 2:05 am
(17) KDYER says:

One day…All questions and misgivings will be answered and corrected. That is a fact and Truth. Peace be with you who have written on this wall. I know one thing…I know nothing but Christ crucified.

October 7, 2011 at 8:52 am
(18) TradCatholic says:

Wow. This is very, very wrong. On so many levels. Mark 8:36-38. Please read that. It is too long to post here. Our Lord clearly tells us that if we are ashamed of him in this sinful and adulterous world, then he will be ashamed of us when we meet Our Maker. This is filled with modernist drivel. Mr. Jobs denied Our Lord until his last breath. Sad. God does not us down and Heaven does not “catch” us. Heaven is our eternal reward for living our lives for Our Lord. Hell is our eternal punishment for rejecting Him who created us. You had a fine opportunity to address Catholics by reminding us to live everyday as our last—to go to confession often, to receive the Sacraments, and to reject the modern trappings of this world by keeping our eyes on the Lord. I hope and pray that Mr. Job’s Guardian Angel was able to help him. No matter how much good we do in this world, how much we give or contribute, it will all be for nothing if we deny Our Lord. Shame on you. And may God have mercy on Mr. Jobs soul.

October 7, 2011 at 2:55 pm
(19) Scott P. Richert says:

“TradCatholic,” I wasn’t present at Steve Jobs’ death, as you clearly were. Or at least I assume that’s what you’re claiming when you write, “Mr. Jobs denied Our Lord until his last breath,” since there would be no other way for you to know that to be true.

Nothing I wrote denied Mark 8:36-38. Indeed, Mark 8: 36 (“For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?”) was at the front of my mind as I wrote “The remembrance of death reminds us that the only thing we have to lose is our immortal soul. Take up your cross, and follow Christ, and everything else will take care of itself.”

But, unless you truly were present at Mr. Job’s death and heard him deny Our Lord with his last breath, you cannot know that Mark 8:38 (“Whosoever therefore shall be ashamed of me and of my words in this adulterous and sinful generation; of him also shall the Son of man be ashamed, when he cometh in the glory of his Father with the holy angels.”) applies. All you can do is assume that it does, and in making that assumption, you set aside the Christian duty of charity.

Yet still you puzzle me, because in dismissing what I wrote as “modernist drivel” and crying “Shame on you,” you write, ” I hope and pray that Mr. Job’s Guardian Angel was able to help him.” How that differs from my penultimate paragraph, I fail to see. (I do note, however, that you express this a hope, which seems to indicate that you weren’t there at Mr. Jobs’ bedside after all.)

October 7, 2011 at 2:57 pm
(20) Scott P. Richert says:

One final remark, “TradCatholic.” I know quite a few traditional Catholics—indeed, I am one myself, as you could discover quite easily on this GuideSite. You, I must say, are the first I’ve encountered who apparently has no use for Francis Thompson’s poetry. In my experience, “The Hound of Heaven” is a dear favorite among most traditional Catholics, and while the hound is a somewhat different image, the poem does deliberately call to mind the Good Shepherd who leaves behind the 99 and goes in search of the one that is lost. And, when He finds him, catches him up on His shoulders and returns him to the flock.

October 7, 2011 at 11:08 am
(21) Echo says:

Wow. These comments make me glad I’m not a Catholic. You people sound like the folks at the Westboro Baptist Church who are planning to picket Steve Jobs’ funeral.

Thanks, Scott, for your thoughtful blog. Too bad your vocal readers have such narrow minds.

October 7, 2011 at 4:09 pm
(22) Maggie Metcalf says:

Sorry that some of these comments have led you to assume that Catholics in any way resemble the Westboro people. Some might, but are not representative of members of our faith. I am the niece of a Catholic priest, attended Catholic school, and have always been taught not to judge others. That and the fact that no one has any way of knowing what goes on between the Lord and an individual on their deathbed. Shame on those of any faith who are judging Mr. Jobs. They should take a good look at themselves and think about what they have done to improve the lives of others lately. Since that is a big part of what I have been taught Christianity is about.

October 8, 2011 at 11:55 am
(23) Faith says:

Christianity is what the Bible says.

16“For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son,f that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.John3:16

1Everyone who believes that Jesus is the Christ is born of God, and everyone who loves the father loves his child as well 1john 5:1

10Anyone who believes in the Son of God has this testimony in his heart. Anyone who does not believe God has made him out to be a liar, because he has not believed the testimony God has given about his Son. 11And this is the testimony: God has given us eternal life, and this life is in his Son. 12He who has the Son has life; he who does not have the Son of God does not have life. 1john5: 10-12

October 7, 2011 at 7:19 pm
(24) The Bunnymen says:

I think some of the readers are concerned for people who might miss Scott’s point and think it’s safe to leave everything permanent to the last minute.

Unfortunately,, the average person, which describes most people in life including readers of this blog, is not a very good writer, so it’s a little unfair to expect everyone to have Scott’s way with words.

October 7, 2011 at 1:18 pm
(25) Fr. Robert (Anglican) says:

Well our idols die hard don’t they! And whatever Mr. Jobs was before God? Is now between God and him forever! And baptism and confirmation, without continued faith of course mean nothing in the soteriological sense. One must simply be ‘In Christ’ for salvation! And here is a living, breathing faith itself!

Btw, being a baby boomer myself (62 late this month), my idols have not been in computers or iphones, but my own “heart”! Jesus said..”Listen to me, everyone, and understand this. Nothing outside a person can defile them by going into them (foods, etc.) Rather, it is what comes out of a person that defiles them.” (Mark 7: 14-15, see too verses 20-23). So indeed God alone judges our heart and inner-man/person!

October 7, 2011 at 3:10 pm
(26) Scott P. Richert says:

“And baptism and confirmation, without continued faith of course mean nothing in the soteriological sense. One must simply be ‘In Christ’ for salvation! And here is a living, breathing faith itself!”

Father Robert, you know I do not disagree with you on this point. Yet you seem to be overstating it. Both Catholics and Anglicans affirm that there is a difference between a man who was baptized and confirmed and later lost his faith, and one who was never baptized, much less confirmed.

Baptism, by itself, cannot save a man (and nothing I wrote implied that it could). But in those last moments of one’s life, when one is faced with the reality of death (not simply one’s intellectual understanding of it), the indelible mark left by baptism may well play a role in repentance and conversion of heart.

October 8, 2011 at 7:48 am
(27) Mary@42 says:

Without reading all the Responses on this Article, may I humbly refer you – my beloved people of God – to Christ’s Promise to St. Maria Faustina Kowalska, His Apostle and Secretary of the Divine Mercy? For every soul especially one marked with the Sign of His Death and Resurrection (that is by Baptism – and for Jobs re-affirmed by the Sacrament of Confirmation) God is there with that Soul at the final Hour, ready to pour His Graces upon that soul and re-claim it at His Own. May I refer you all to Google “Divine Mercy in My Soul”- St. Faustina’s Diary Nos.1485 – 1489. I have no doubt whatsoever that at that critical Moment of Mr. Job’s life, Jesus was right there with him and I have no reason to doubt He did not claim his Soul and His very own. Eternal Rest Grant unto him, O Lord, and may Perpetual Light Shine Upon him. May he Rest in Peace. Amen

October 8, 2011 at 9:27 am
(28) Mary@42 says:

Now that I have read your Responses, may I quote you what Jesus Christ Himself revealed to St. Faustina about how God deals with a soul at the moment of death: I shall take the 2nd Conversation of God with a Dying Soul, this time with a Despairing Soul.
Diary No.1486 : Conversation of the Merciful God with a Despairing Soul:

Jesus: “O soul steeped in darkness, do not despair. All is not yet lost. Come and confide in your God, who is Love and Mercy.”

October 8, 2011 at 11:00 am
(29) Forgiven says:

What the Bible says in Revelation20: 11-15

11And I saw a great white throne, and him that sat on it, from whose face the earth and the heaven fled away; and there was found no place for them. 12And I saw the dead, small and great, stand before God; and the books were opened: and another book was opened, which is the book of life: and the dead were judged out of those things which were written in the books, according to their works. 13And the sea gave up the dead which were in it; and death and hell delivered up the dead which were in them: and they were judged every man according to their works. 14And death and hell were cast into the lake of fire. This is the second death. 15And whoever was not found written in the book of life was cast into the lake of fire.

People die once, and after that they are judged. Hebrews9: 27

——————————————————————————–

October 8, 2011 at 9:29 am
(30) Mary@42 says:

But the soul, deaf even to this appeal, wraps itself in darkness.
Jesus calls out again: “My child, listen to the Voice of Your Merciful Father.”
– In the soul arises this reply: ‘For me there is no Mercy,’ and it falls
into greater darkness, a despair which is a foretaste of hell and makes it unable to draw near to God. Jesus calls a third time, but the soul remains deaf and blind, hardened and despairing.

Then the Mercy of God begins to exert Itself, and, without any co-operation from the soul, God grants it Final Grace. If this, too, is spurned, God will leave the soul in this self-chosen disposition for eternity.

This Grace emerges from the Merciful Heart of Jesus and gives the soul a special light by means of which the soul begins to understand God’s effort; but conversion depends on its own Will. The soul knows that this, for it, is the final Grace and, should it show even a flicker of goodwill, the Mercy of God will accomplish the rest!!!!.

October 8, 2011 at 9:30 am
(31) Mary@42 says:

God: “My Omnipotent Mercy is active here. Happy the soul that takes advantage of this Grace.”

Jesus: “What joy fills My Heart when you return to Me. Because you are weak, I take you in My Arms and carry you to the Home of My Father.”

The soul (as if awaking, asks fearfully): “Is it possible that there yet is Mercy for me?”

Jesus: There is, My child. You have a special claim on My Mercy. Let it act in your poor soul; let the Rays of My Grace enter your soul; they bring with them light, warmth and Life.”

Soul: “But fear fills me at the thought of my sins, and this terrible fear moves me to doubt Your goodness.”

Jesus: “My child, all your sins have not wounded My Heart as painfully as your present lack of trust does – that after so many efforts of My Love and Mercy, you should still doubt my Goodness.”

Soul: “O Lord, save me Yourself, for I perish. Be my Saviour, O Lord. I am unable to say anything more: my pitiful heart is torn asunder, but You, O Lord…. “

October 8, 2011 at 9:30 am
(32) Mary@42 says:

Jesus does not let the soul finish but, raising it from the ground, from the depths of its misery, He leads it into the recess of His Heart where all its sins disappear instantly, consumed by the Flames of Love.

Jesus: “Here, soul, are all the Treasures of My Heart. Take everything you need from it.”…………..

Soul – now united with the Heart of Jesus. “…O Lord, now I see my ingratitude and Your goodness. You were pursuing me with Your Grace, while I was frustrating Your benevolence. I see that I deserve the depths of hell for spurring Your Graces.”..

Jesus, (interrupting): Do not be absorbed in your misery…….rather, gaze on My Heart filled with goodness, and be imbued with My Mercy…..”

The above – my beloved people of God – are revelations Jesus made to St. Faustina on numerous occasions when He asked her to pray for a drying sinful soul which needed saving, and of how God never, ever gives up on a Soul He created. At the critical moment when the soul is about to leave the body, Jesus gave us to understand God is there with His omnipotent Love and Mercy to save that soul. As a Cradle Catholic, I believe God repeats this Act of His Unfathomable Saving Mercy to each and every sinful soul at the moment of death. He has categorically stated He has no wish to lose a soul He created. We must surely believe Him because He is God and God is Truth and He loves each and everyone of us and His desire is to receive each and every one us in Heaven when our moment of departure arrives.

Let us be charitable and believe that a dialogue like this one which Jesus revealed to St. Faustina, took place between God and Mr. Jobs as the minutes ticked to seconds before his soul separated from his body.

October 8, 2011 at 2:47 pm
(33) Margaret Plan says:

I love the fact that Steve Jobs died on the Feast of St. Faustina, the Apostle of Divine Mercy. Enough said.

October 10, 2011 at 10:45 am
(34) Mary Johnson says:

I would like to say what a wonderful man Steve Jobs is. He had a wisdom and knowledge beyond many of the learned people I have met. His was truly a life well lived; in him we see a person created by God who used his God given intelligence (and it was a blessing from God) to the utmost. He didn’t waste a minute on this earth. Well done, good and faithful servant! And from me and your fellow travelers, thank you for all you have done. MJ

January 25, 2012 at 10:26 pm
(35) angela says:

@mary42: sorry to pick you out from all the comments. but i couldnt help but notice that all your referrals to issues pertaining to life after death is a diary of a person. whatever happend to the bible? everything concerning life after death is written there. am sure you must read the new testament. i just want to remind you to get your facts from the bible which has been around and will continue to be till the end of age and not some person’s diary. on the issue of the death of steve job and where he is now; honestly none of us can say with certainty where he will be. only God does. and since the bible has said we should judge not so that we wont be judged, i suggest we desist from debating whether he went to heaven or hell. my prayer is that at the point of death, he had given his life to Jesus Christ and accepted Him as his Lord and saviour. it is also a time of reflection for everyone that no matter ur success in this world, some day you will gone and how you have lived in this world will determine where you will spend eternity. religion cannot take you to heaven. its your personal relationship with Jesus Christ that wil determine it. may God help us.

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